Pediatric dentistry

Pediatric Dentist cincinnati ohio

Pediatric Dentist CincinnatiDr Yash is a family dentist who sees patients of all ages.   He provides a safe, child-friendly environment so that children are comfortable with their first experience at the dentist.  He understands that how the dentist interacts with the child is vital for the child’s future interaction with dentistry. With dental phobias generally beginning in childhood, it is imperative that you choose a dentist who can provide a positive experience for you and your child.

Your child’s first visits to the dentist includes:
Education – Dr Yash educates children using mediums such as models or educational videos, which are child-friendly and emphasize the importance of keeping teeth strong and healthy.  In addition, he advises parents on the prevention of disease and trauma, as well as instruction regarding good eating habits, and oral hygiene practices in the home.

Monitoring growth – Dr Yash continuously monitors a child’s teeth at regularly scheduled check-ups to ensure proper development. With proper monitoring he will be able to take preventative measures to ensure issues don’t arise or to intervene if they do. Earlier dental intervention is beneficial to helping your child foster a positive self-image.

Prevention – The establishment of sound eating and oral care habits help to prevent or reduce the development of oral decay. With regular check ups and dental cleanings Dr Yash can apply sealants and topical fluoride to young teeth. Parents will also be advised on habits that contribute to oral issues such as thumb sucking, pacifiers, and adolescent smoking.

Intervention – It may be necessary to discuss the possibility of early oral treatments with parents and children.  In the case of oral injury, malocclusion (bad bite), or bruxism (grinding), space maintainers, a nighttime mouth guard, or reconstructive surgery may be recommended.

Why are primary teeth important?    All of the primary teeth begin to develop beneath the gums during the fourth month of pregnancy.  By the age of three most children will have a full set of twenty primary teeth.

A common misconception about primary teeth is that they are not relevant to the child’s future dental health.  This is not true.  The functions of primary teeth are:

Eating and nutrition:  Primary teeth promote good chewing habits and enable the child to eat well.

Speech development:  Primary teeth keep the tongue in place and facilitate correct pronunciation.  Learning to speak clearly is important for a child’s social, cognitive, and emotional development.

Straight adult teeth:  The primary teeth maintain the spacing needed for the developing adult teeth.  Having the proper space for adult teeth ensures the correct alignment of the adult teeth.

Because of these reasons, it is important to care for a child’s emerging teeth properly.  The American Dental Association recommends that the first “well baby” dental visit should be at the age of twelve months, or six months after the first tooth appears.  This visit will acquaint the child with the dentist’s office, allows the dentist to check dental development, and provides an opportunity for parents to ask questions.

When will my baby get his first teeth?
 Although there are differences between children, primary (baby) teeth usually emerge between the ages of six and eight months.  A set of twenty primary teeth will emerge by the time the child is three years old.

It is recommended that the first “well baby” dental visit should be at the age of twelve months, or six months after the first tooth appears.  This visit will acquaint the child with the dentist’s office, allows the dentist to check its dental development, and provides an opportunity for parents to ask questions.

Which teeth emerge first? 
Generally teeth emerge in pairs, beginning at the front of the infant’s mouth with the two lower central incisors.  Next, the two upper central incisors emerge.  After that the upper and lower lateral incisors emerge, one on either side of the top two and bottom two teeth.  Eight more teeth will appear, usually between the ages of  13 and 23 months.  A cuspid or canine tooth will appear next to each lateral incisor and behind them the first molars will emerge.  Finally a second set of molars appears, usually beginning with the bottom arch.

Teething is often quite uncomfortable for an infant.  Teething rings and cold damp cloths are helpful to ease the discomfort and irritation.

How to reduce the risk of early cavities
Primary teeth are very important to a child’s development.  They preserve space for permanent teeth and establish their later alignment.  They also help the child with chewing its food and learning to speak, and they keep the tongue from positioning abnormally.  Because of these reasons, it is important to care for a child’s emerging teeth properly.

Brush twice a day:  The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that children use a pea-sized amount toothpaste.  Children under two years old should use non-fluoridated toothpaste; children over this age should use fluoridated toothpaste.  Their toothbrush should be soft-bristled and child-sized.

Start to floss:  It can be difficult to floss a young child’s teeth but the habit should start when two adjacent teeth have emerged.  Dr Yash and his staff are happy to demonstrate good flossing techniques.

Avoid certain foods:  Starches and sugars encourage bacteria to grow in the mouth.  This bacteria produces acid that will harm tooth enamel.  Children should eat a well balanced diet and avoid sugary and starchy snacks.

Set a good example:  When children see their parents brushing and flossing they are likely to want to follow their example.  Explain the importance of good dental hygiene.  There are many age-appropriate books to help with this.

Visit the dentist:   Dr Yash will monitor oral development, clean the child’s teeth, apply fluoride, and coat the molars with sealant.  Visiting the dentist every six months can help to prevent many unpleasant conditions later.

Dr Yash has patients of all ages.  If you have any questions or concerns about your child’s dental health please call or contact our office.